Ministry of education and culture grants 215,000 euros for the development of sports in higher education

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The Ministry of Education and Culture has granted a total of 215,000 euros to six different projects with the aim to develop sports in higher education. The annual national development grant for an active lifestyle was awarded to the Finnish Student Sports Federation (OLL), the University of Vaasa, and the universities of applied sciences in Kajaani, Lahti, Seinäjoki and Satakunta. The projects of the higher education institutions include activities which aim to start sports services, create a more active operating culture, and reach students who do not get enough exercise.

The Finnish Student Sports Federation was granted 15,000 euros for a project launched in 2018 which aims to use methods based on values and consent as part of the sports guidance offered by the universities’ sports services. During the spring, this operations model has been trialled at Haaga-Helia University of Applied Sciences. The results of the trial will also be used at other higher education institutions during this year.

The next application period for this grant will be in the autumn 2019. For more information about grants meant for higher education sports and for advice on applying for them, please contact Anni Liina Ikonen (anniliina.ikonen@oll.fi).

Anni Liina Ikonen

Special Advisor for University Sport (on family leave)

Author profile: Anni Liina Ikonen

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